Experience

Experienced gained from

  • Successful combat
  • Revealing secrets in conversations
  • Solving quests
  • Exploration

Possible extensions

Experience varies: E.g. the character who actually killed the enemy gets twice what everyone else gets. Or depends on outcome of action:

  • 2 experience points for every successful regular attack against a foe
  • 6 experience points for every critical hit against a foe
  • 1 experience point for every successful casting of a spell┬áper points put into the spell, so for a 15-point “magic bolt,” I got 15 experience points. What’s also cool is this applies to defensive and healing spells, too.
  • 35 points for each kill

Dump experience in skills: The ability to dump experience directly into skills means that development is constant and palpable.

Decisions based on

You get experience only for things which challenge you. Killing an orc with a +15 sword and level 50 will give you nothing as a reward.

This is a good system ,though I personally prefer if games give you XP relative to the player’s and enemy’s level. Although that’s probably difficult to ballance well. Tactics Ogre has a great system, where you always need 100 XP to advance a level, but the amount you get varies strongly, depending on player and enemy level. One attack against a higher level enemy might give you 20 XP – a fifth of a level, but if you want to mindlessly grind against weaker enemies, you’ll only get one XP per hit, so you’d have to defeat 50 to 100 enemies to gain one level

Characters get experience for casting spells outside of combat, as well as for talking with NPCs. That’s a great system.

One thing I like about the game is the way experience points are earned, which is based on successful action rather than just a “kill.” I spent some time in a recent battle trying to figure out exactly what I was getting for each action. For all I know, the numbers vary considerably given the type of foe and other considerations, but for my battle with a couple of ogres, my characters seemed to get:

  • 2 experience points for every successful regular attack against a foe
  • 6 experience points for every critical hit against a foe
  • 1 experience point for every successful casting of a spell┬áper points put into the spell, so for a 15-point “magic bolt,” I got 15 experience points. What’s also cool is this applies to defensive and healing spells, too.
  • 35 points for each kill

I do like the game’s approach to distributing gold and experience after battles. Where most games either give them to the character who struck the killing blow (Ultima IV) or distribute them evenly among party members (the default), Xyphus adopts a hybrid: the character who actually killed the enemy gets twice what everyone else gets.

You get a small amount of experience for disarming traps. I can’t remember a previous game that does this.

The ability to dump experience directly into skills means that development is constant and palpable.

Since you get experience from every battle and can spend it more-or-less immediately, character development is swift and constant

Firstly you receive half the experience for any hits you land on an opponent e.g. if you hit for 6 points of damage you would instantly gain 3 points of experience.

Directly buy power (spell and weapon skill) with XP

Secondly on winning an encounter you appear to get an experience bonus which is based on the opponent’s initial hit points multiplied by a factor – in many cases this is two but in the case of say a Ghost this could be as high as eight.

Success is heavily dependent on developing a couple dozen magic, combat, and adventuring skills, on which you directly spend experience.

I’m discovering that the game awards both individual experience (for successful actions like casting spells) and party experience. We’ve had games that have done one or the other before, but I’m not sure we’ve ever seen a game that does both.

As in Crown, accumulated experience points are spent directly on improvement of skills an attributes. Some of the weaknesses are here, too, including a sense of micromanagement that I admit might leave my final review echoing CGW’s if the game lasts too long

You gain experience when you kill monsters in the dungeon, but you have to rest at an inn to “absorb experience” and thus gain levels.

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